Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Neo-Aristotelian Perspectives in Metaphysics


My article “Being, the Good, and the Guise of the Good” appears in the volume Neo-Aristotelian Perspectives in Metaphysics, edited by Daniel D. Novotný and Lukáš Novák and forthcoming from Routledge.  The other contributors to the volume are Jorge J. E. Gracia, William F. Vallicella, E. Jonathan Lowe, Gyula Klima, Michael Gorman, Michael J. Loux, David S. Oderberg, Edmund Runggaldier, Uwe Meixner, James Franklin, Robert Koons, William Lane Craig, and Nicholas Rescher.

Here’s the abstract of my paper:

This paper puts forward an exposition and defense of an Aristotelian-Scholastic conception of the good, and in particular of the theses that goodness is convertible with being and that all action is directed at the good.  The former thesis will be defended against the objection, longstanding within modern philosophy, that there is a “fact/value dichotomy” such that any attempt to derive claims about goodness from claims about the existence and nature of things commits a “naturalistic fallacy.”  The latter thesis will be defended against the recent criticisms of J. David Velleman.  The application of the theses in question to the natural law approach to ethics and to natural theology will be noted in the course of the discussion.

8 comments:

Daniel said...

A new article from the good Mr Oderberg is always worth sticking around for - now if only the man would write another blasted book...

Anonymous said...

This is a book I want to read! Hopefully my university's library picks it up quickly...

Scott said...

That's quite a lineup in that table of contents. The price is a bit steep for those of us who aren't academic libraries, but we'll see.

Kjetil Kringlebotten said...

I hope you will be add a copy of your article online. $114 is way too much!

Anonymous said...

Y'all should get into the habit of (befriending and then) pestering your public librarians to order books for you!

JP said...

The book title starts with "Neo" and the editors' surnames both relate to the Czech word "Novy" which also means "new" ;)Is this a conspiracy?

Anonymous said...

Mr. Feser:

Many thanks for your splendid blog spot. As a Catholic Seminarian in the 80's, and now a priest, I'd always wondered what I'd missed when I was "processed" through the system without any training in Aquinas - either on the Philosophy or Theology side. I especially appreciate the Scholastic's Bookshelf and your excellent work(s) on Thomas Aquinas as well. v/r Fr. John

Anonymous said...

Powerful team of contributors!