Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Scholastic’s Bookshelf, Part IV (UPDATED)

I have recommended Michael Cronin’s long out-of-print two-volume The Science of Ethics as possibly the best of the old Neo-Scholastic manuals of ethics written in English. Reader Deogolwulf kindly informs us that both volumes are available online via archive.org. Browsing through the archive, I’ve found several other old philosophical and theological works worth calling attention to, which (along with Cronin) I’ve listed below, as an addition to my “Scholastic’s Bookshelf” series of posts (the earlier installments of which can be found here, here, and here). I’ll add further works to the list as I discover them:

Bernard Boedder, Natural Theology

Philotheus Boehner, Medieval Logic

P. Coffey, Epistemology, Volume I and Volume II

P. Coffey, Ontology

P. Coffey, The Science of Logic, Volume I and Volume II

Charles Coppens, A Brief Textbook of Logic and Mental Philosophy

Charles Coppens, A Brief Textbook of Moral Philosophy

Michael Cronin, The Science of Ethics, Volume I and Volume II

Walter Devivier and Sebastian Messmer, Christian Apologetics: A Defense of the Catholic Faith

Maurice de Wulf, Scholasticism Old and New

Thomas Gilby, Barbara Celarent: A Description of Scholastic Dialectic

Thomas Harper, The Metaphysics of the School, Volume I, Volume II, and Volume III

Sylvester Joseph Hunter, Outlines of Dogmatic Theology, Volume I, Volume II, and Volume III

G. H. Joyce, Principles of Logic

G. H. Joyce, Principles of Natural Theology

A. Koch and A. Preuss, A Handbook of Moral Theology, Volume I, Volume II, and Volume III

Michael Maher, Psychology: Empirical and Rational

Cardinal Mercier et al., A Manual of Modern Scholastic Philosophy, Volume I and Volume II

John O’Neill, Cosmology: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Matter

J. Pohle and A. Preuss, Christology

J. Pohle and A. Preuss, The Divine Trinity

J. Pohle and A. Preuss, Eschatology, or The Catholic Doctrine of the Last Things

J. Pohle and A. Preuss, God: His Knowability, Essence, and Attributes

J. Pohle and A. Preuss, God, the Author of Nature and the Supernatural

J. Pohle and A. Preuss, Grace, Actual and Habitual

J. Pohle and A. Preuss, Mariology

J. Pohle and A. Preuss, The Sacraments, Volume I, Volume II, Volume III, and Volume IV

J. Pohle and A. Preuss, Soteriology

John Rickaby, General Metaphysics

Joseph Rickaby, Scholasticism

M. Scheeben, J. Wilhelm, and T. B. Scannell, A Manual of Catholic Theology, Based on Scheeben’s Dogmatik, Volume I and Volume II

Thomas Walshe, Principles of Christian Apologetics

12 comments:

Fr. Horton said...

The Pohle/Preuss series is one of my favorite references, but you might want to be careful with the one on grace. Pohle was a Jesuit of the Molinist persuasion, more or less, and his treatment of predestination is (IMHO) not fair to the Thomistic theory.

David said...

Wittgenstein's first philosophical publication was a review of Coffey's
Science of Logic.

Anonymous said...

A book that also may be of interest to these here, and possibly Ed himself: The Waning of Materialism.

Edward Feser said...

Hello everyone, I've added a number of new titles to the list. Archive.org seems more or less confined to works in the public domain, so many of the best works of the genre aren't available, but there's still lots of good stuff there, as the list shows.

Fr. Horton,

Interesting, I did not know that -- Grace is a Pohle volume I hadn't seen before.

David,

Yes indeed, and it can be found online by Googling "Wittgenstein Coffey." Not Wittgenstein's finest hour.

Anonymous,

As it happens, that just arrived in the mail today -- very interesting indeed.

danielj said...

Wow! Thanks Ed.

Bobcat said...

Ed,

How many of these have you read? If the answer is "a lot", where do you find the time?

Alphonsus said...

"Not Wittgenstein's finest hour."

Why did he write such a nasty review?

Edward Feser said...

Bobcat,

Well, I've read at least big chunks of a lot of old Neo-Scholastic stuff. Since I never seem to have enough time to do anything, I have no idea where I find it...

Alan Aversa said...

God multiplies time.

Also, has anyone here read Barbara Celarent? I've heard it is good, and it's free on Archive.org.

Alan Aversa said...

What about Osterle's, Clarke's, or Simmons's logic books? Thanks

Anonymous said...

Glad to see you recommend A Manual of Modern Scholastic Philosophy Vols 1 & 2. I never understood Thomas's First Way until I ran across Vol 2 by Cardinal Mercier. He is even better than Gilson.

Alan Aversa said...

Principles of Catholic Apologetics by Walshe, based on Fr. Garrigou-Lagrange's De Revelatione (vol. 2), is free online.