Wednesday, April 8, 2009

TLS on radio

Arizona readers and podcast listeners everywhere might be interested to know that I will be on The James Allen Show this Saturday (April 11th) to discuss The Last Superstition, from roughly 9-10pm PST. (See here for a previous radio interview about TLS.)

I’m in Midterm Grading Hell this week, so posting will be light.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Looking forward to hearing it, Dr. Feser. And Happy Easter to you.

BTW, if you get time during your grading hell - I was wondering what you thought of the arguments in Michael Rea's "World Without Design", if you're familiar with them? Thanks.

Anonymous said...

And to add on a question, so long as we're naggingweb.ics.purdue.edu/~brower/Papers/Theism%20and%20Platonism.pdf - does this paper impact anything you have to say in TLS? I just saw a link of it over on Alexander Pruss' blog.

Aaron said...

Dr.Feser, do you know if the interview will be taped so that those of us unable to listen saturday night will still be able to hear it?

Tor Hershman said...

A wee video. You'll notice that I include atheism with the religions.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_m6qC6FCiY0

Ricky 'The Hitman' Hatton said...

Glad I found this blog.
Great information.

Dr. Feser, have you ever heard of a Catholic philosopher from Benedictine College named Dr. James Madden?

Michael B said...

A general fyi, the mp3 of the James Allen Show segment in question is now available at the provided link. The interview with Dr. Feser begins at 4:30 into the segment and lasts till the end of the 40+ minute mp3.

I tend to think such interviews (i.e. brief, general and popular) can be served by interjecting some anthropic, scientific oriented facts (e.g., Robert Koons on the subject) toward the beginning of the interview because 1) it is science and rationality per se that the "new atheists" so often purport to contrast with religion, faith, the Judeo-Christian underpinnings of western civ, etc. and 2) philosophy as such, while it is certainly a rational enterprise, is less given to popular apprehensions in that vein for a variety of reasons, not least of all due to its often arcane and abstruse nature.